All posts by Marie

An accessible Canada isn’t possible without an accessible Quebec

Nearly 150 people attended the consultation held in Montreal on November 16, 2016. Québec accessible was there! Photo Credit: Government of Canada
Nearly 150 people attended the consultation held in Montreal on November 16, 2016. Québec accessible was there! Photo Credit: Government of Canada

What does an “accessible Canada” mean for you?

The federal government asked this question during consultations on the future federal accessibility act.

Québec Accessible participated in the consultations held in Quebec and Montreal. We observed a strong interest on behalf of people with disabilities and their allies.

Topics discussed included employment discrimination, barriers in public transit, recognition of LSQ and ASL as official languages, the shortage of services to ensure that people with disabilities and their families live with dignity, and differences in levels of accessibility across cities, regions, provinces and territories.

The majority of the issues raised during the consultations directly or indirectly touched on areas within provincial jurisdiction. However, the new federal legislation will only address areas within the federal jurisdiction. Once again, this shows the need for a strong provincial law in Quebec law to address barriers and ableism (discrimination based on disability). If you share this opinion, add your name to the list of individuals and / or organizations calling for a stronger provincial accessibility law.

An accessible Canada isn’t possible without an accessible Quebec!

Laurence Parent of Québec accessible attended the consultation held in Quebec City on November 10, 2016. The Minister of Family, Children and Social Development, Jean-Yves Duclos, was present. Photo Credit: Government of Canada
Laurence Parent of Québec accessible attended the consultation held in Quebec City on November 10, 2016. The Minister of Family, Children and Social Development, Jean-Yves Duclos, was present. Photo Credit: Government of Canada

 

International Day of Persons with Disabilities: Canada 1 / Quebec 0

On December 1st, the Government of Canada announced that it was starting the process of ratifying the  Optional Protocol of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). It’s about time! Ninety-two countries have already ratified the Protocol.

Canada ratified the CRPD in 2010, but it hasn’t yet ratified the Optional Protocol. Essentially, this Protocol would allow Canadian organizations and citizens to file a complaint with the UN if their rights aren’t respected. Canada, the provinces and the territories will therefore have a new incentive to create an accessible and inclusive society!

In a video highlighting the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, reminds us that “people with disabilities still face barriers to fully participating in society both in Canada and around the world”. The Minister, herself a disabled person, invites us to join her in “celebrating Canadians with disabilities and embrace a cultural change about accessibility and inclusion in Canadian society”. Continue reading International Day of Persons with Disabilities: Canada 1 / Quebec 0

Participate in the Public Consultation on the Proposed Federal Accessibility Law

The Government of Canada has launched a public consultation about the proposed federal accessibility law. This law will promote equal opportunities and increase the inclusion and participation of Canadians with disabilities.

Individuals are invited to share their ideas and experiences about the barriers they face. For more information about the consultation , click here.

To complete the government’s survey , click here .

Let’s all share our experiences to ensure that the new federal law addresses our needs!

Montreal Gazette Interview with Laurence Parent

Last week, the Caisse de dépôt et de placement du Québec announced the construction of a new light-rail network in the Montreal region. According to the Caisse, this new network will be fully accessible. But can we be sure?

“Parent, whose group is pushing for the province to adopt a law that would require all public transit to have wheelchair access, said she is still skeptical because there have been many unfulfilled promises about universal accessibility in the past. The new Mascouche line was supposed to be fully accessible, but the Agence métropolitaine de transport has gone back on that promise, saying it would cost too much to make the Mount-Royal and Canora stations accessible.”

Click here to read the full article.